How I Use Twitter Professionally – Version 4

Two and a half years ago I wrote How I Use Twitter Professionally, then revised it with How I Use Twitter Professionally – Updated! and How I Use Twitter Professionally – Updated Again!

I guess we’ll make it an annual thing:

My tweets are public.

I’m trying to encourage conversation and collaboration, so my tweets are globally accessible. This also means I don’t make statements I wouldn’t be comfortable with anyone reading – my family, my students, my employer….

I don’t follow a lot of people.

I currently follow 370 people, of whom about 250 are actively tweeting (let’s say at least weekly). Some of these aren’t related to education; for example, I follow The LEGO Group (@LEGO_Group) and authors John Scalzi (@scalzi) and Marko Kloos (@markokloos – he has a new book out today!).

I can’t read all of the stuff they tweet. I’m relying on my tweeps to retweet the really good stuff so I have a better chance of seeing it, or to mention me if it’s something they think I ought to notice.

I accept anyone as a follower, pretty much.

Except for a few obvious accounts, I let anyone follow me. Since my tweets are public, anyone can read them (even without a Twitter account), so letting people follow me doesn’t reveal anything extra. Plus, it’s easier when you don’t have to approve people.

I don’t follow back as a courtesy.

Before I decide to follow someone, I take a look at their tweet history. Is their stream of tweets going to enhance my experience? Will I learn from them? Or will I only learn what they had for breakfast?

I’m a fan of some personal stuff on Twitter, but if you post 300 times a day just to talk without conversing, I don’t need to see it. It’s not about you, it’s just that your use of Twitter doesn’t fit with mine. I think your lifestyle on Twitter should be like the Law of Two Feet: if it’s not working for you, move on.

I don’t accept Direct Messages (DMs) from people I don’t follow.

This cuts down on the spam. Now it’s just mentions, and there aren’t too many of those. This is a good idea for anyone, so I thought I’d list it here.

I also don’t follow people who I don’t want to DM me. That especially includes students. I have my school email for that kind of communication.

I follow hashtags for a while.

I follow #OTRK12 (our annual conference in Mississauga – this week!) and #elADSB (for my Board’s e-Learning teachers). I don’t follow the very busy tags, although I sometimes apply them to my posts (#D2L, #onted, #blendedlearning, #edtech).

I try to follow the people in Northern Ontario. We face many of the same issues, and perhaps we have solutions to help each other. I like that idea.

I don’t cross post to Facebook anymore.

I tweet too much. No one on Facebook wants to read all of that stuff. The handful of FB friends who do are also Twitter users and teachers, so they just go to Twitter to find me. When I write blog posts WordPress will publicize them on Facebook, Twitter, and Google Plus, and I’m certain that’s plenty for the FB crowd.

I use Tweetdeck; it rocks.

Chrome has TweetDeck as an app; I like that I can have columns for a variety of things I want to look at. Currently I have my Twitter timeline, my Twitter Interactions, my Twitter Messages (DMs), and columns for a bunch of hashtags and lists I follow.

I say things for myself, and I say things for others.

I tweet things that I want to remember or revisit (great for “note-taking” at a session/workshop/conference). I also tweet things to inform others or start conversations. My tweets (of links and such) aren’t endorsements, but since people sometimes view them that way I try not to share stuff that I’m not at least familiar with.

I talk a lot, but not too much

I try to ask questions and help out when others ask questions. I’m proud to say I am included as an honourary member of the SGDSB educators list because I help out the teachers up there, so I think my contributions are valued.

More importantly, I’m developing relationships with these distant folks, and the growth of my PLN has helped me out in my work as well. It was very exciting last year at OTRK12 to meet people whom I knew only through Twitter, and it was surprising how natural the face-to-face interactions felt. We were already friends. So thanks, tweeps.

If you want to follow me…

I’m @bgrasley. No pressure, of course. Use Twitter however it works best for you, and don’t be upset if other people use it differently!

Session Preparation for #OTRK12

Yup, On The Rise is this week. It’s hard to believe we’re that far into the school year already, and it’s harder to believe that it’s been over year since OTRK12 2014.

This year I’m very happy to be presenting on Friday morning. The session title is “How To Become An EdTech Leader” and it’s for school and system leaders. Here’s the official description:

What does it take to be a leader in educational technology (EdTech) today? You don’t need to be a technical wizard. You do need to be willing to connect to a community, listen to others, and share what you’re doing.

We’ll talk about how to create or join different kinds of communities online. We’ll explain some different roles you can have. We’ll have hands-on time for you to get started using a platform of your choice based on your personal goals. And we’ll look at the challenges you can experience trying to lead at different levels of your organization (and propose some solutions!).

You’re coming to this session because you want to be a better leader with EdTech. If you’re a highly connected, social media guru, you probably want to go to a different session.

Did I mention it’s only an hour long? Yup, it’s a big topic. I’m paring down the stuff I’m going to talk about, and I think I’ll have to write an obscenely long blog post to get the rest of it out there.

My basic outline for myself is the following:

  1. Introduce myself (and participants, if there aren’t too many)
  2. Share some types of communities
  3. Develop some goals that participants might have as leaders
  4. Share some roles or stances that leaders can take
  5. List some possible/preferred online platforms
  6. Share challenges/cautions and solutions/suggestions to go with them
  7. Breathe a bit

I’m definitely feeling the time crunch. Sadly, I’m more verbose in person than I am in writing (shocking, I know), so I’ll need to strictly monitor myself. Of course, the actual path I take during the hour will depend on the other learners in the room with me.

Suggestions are very welcome, as always.

A good time was had by all

Yesterday was International TableTop Day, and our family celebrated. We had a big stack of games ready to go, and we played the following: 

  • Magic: The Gathering (even Kerri, out of pity for me)
  • Crazy Eights
  • Chicken/Dice/Ten Thousand
  • Sorry
  • Wizard
  • Checkers
  • Chess (rules heavily modified/ignored by my 7yo)
  • Cribbage

And today we played more games because they were on the table this morning. Everyone agreed that it was a great time, and a fantastic way to be with family. My daughter asked if we could do that every Saturday :)

Summative Task for Quadratics – #MCF3M

My Grade 11 e-Learning math class is completing a unit on quadratic equations. I have a few things happening for their summative assessment, but the part I find most interesting is the following “experiment”. It’s heavily based on the Leaky Tower task from TIPS4RM at EduGAINS.ca. I’m going to test it out tonight with my kids before I finalize the evaluation criteria and post the task. If you have feedback, I’d love to hear it. I’ll be adding photos to help explain the setup.

Leaking Bottle – Summative Task – Part 1

You’ll be completing a short experiment and writing a report to go with it. You can get help from a classmate, family member, etc. while running the experiment, but just as an extra set of hands. No one should be helping you with the math part.

Preparation

Gather the supplies you’ll need:

  • a clear, disposable, empty, plastic bottle
  • a ruler
  • a watch, phone, or other time-keeping device OR a video-recording device.

—photo here—

Carefully poke a hole in the bottle about 3cm from the bottom. Seriously, be careful here. You might try using something sharp, like a pin or a nail, to start the hole, then widen it with a pencil. You want the final hole to have a diameter of 3-7mm. Don’t worry about being super-precise.

—photo here—

Hold a ruler next to your bottle, or tape a ruler to your bottle if you need both of your hands free. You want to be able to measure the water level, so put the “zero” end of the ruler at the bottom.

—photo here—

Cover the hole and fill the bottle with water. If your bottle has a tapered top (like the one pictured here), only fill it up in the cylindrical section (i.e. before it starts to narrow). You can cover the hole with your finger, or you might try a piece of tape (if you use tape, fold the end on itself so it’s easier to remove).

—photo here—

Data Collection

If you’re recording video (easier, I think), start recording. If you’re just using a watch or other timing device, wait for a “good” time, like a whole minute, for a starting point.

Uncover the hole, letting the water in the bottle flow out into a sink or another container. Don’t make a mess; nobody wants a mess.

—photo here—

If you’re using a watch, use the ruler to record the water level every 5 or 10 seconds or so. Pick an easy time to keep track of. Record measurements until the flow of water stops.

If you’re recording a video, let the water finish flowing out, then stop the video. Play the video back, noting the height of the water every 5 or 10 seconds or so.

Analysis

You now have a table of values: time (independent variable) and height measurements (dependent variable). If you didn’t get good data (you lost track of time, the video didn’t work, etc.), perform the experiment again. It doesn’t take long.

  1. Using Desmos, create a scatter plot for your measurements.
  2. Find an equation to fit the data as best you can.
  3. Identify the key points on the graph.
  4. How should the equation you found be restricted? i.e. what should the domain and range be?
  5. Write the equation you found in Standard Form and Vertex Form.

Leaking Bottle – Summative Task – Part 2

One small change

Repeat the above experiment, but this time put another hole about 7-10cm above the first one. Uncover them at the same time, so water will flow out of both holes.

—photo here—

Your analysis will be a little more complex, because you won’t have a single, nice equation that can accurately model the data.

  1. Using Desmos, create a scatter plot for your measurements.
  2. Find an equation (or equations!) to fit the data as best you can.
  3. Identify the key points on the graph.
  4. How should the equation(s) you found be restricted? i.e. what should the domain(s) and range(s) be?
  5. Write the equation(s) you found in Standard Form and Vertex Form.

OrdOp – the math card game using Order of Operations

I played a game with my math students today. It’s called OrdOp, and we used it to practice our mental computation skills. We used standard playing cards, but the “real” version uses cards numbered 0 to 25.

If you want to try it, here are the rules (and printable cards).

OrdOp – standard playing card rules

OrdOp – custom cards and rules

OrdOp – how to play (video)

eBooks – product or service?

Apparently the EU has decided eBooks should be taxed as services (link) instead of goods (like physical books).

I don’t think it’s that simple. 

When Digital Products Are Services

eBook “retailers” like Amazon are essentially offering you a licence to access a digital product, not ownership of a copy of the product. 

Of course, their casual wording might lead you to believe otherwise:



But you’ve purchased a licence, not a book. 

Compare it to NetFlix. You pay a monthly fee to access a library of digital content. It happens to be the same library everyone else gets too, not a customized library. We are more comfortable with the idea of subscription because we aren’t picking specific movies, and we even expect that some titles will disappear. 

These are services – the companies sell access, not goods. 

When Digital Products Are Goods

When I buy a book from Humble Bundle or Baen though, I’m buying a book (aren’t I?). I’m allowed to use it in certain ways (e.g. on multiple devices), and they’re not able to revoke my licence (I don’t think). There is no DRM to lock me into a platform or a service, and the expectation is that I will manage my purchases honestly and appropriately. 

And I’m glad they provide the ability to download my books at any time, but I don’t expect them to maintain my library for me. I keep my local copies, just in case. 

I’m certainly thinking of an eBook as a thing I’m buying, not a licence I’m buying. I want permanent access.

Can’t the Retailer and/or Publisher Choose?

I think there is room for both types of access, but it’s currently not clear to the consumer what they’re paying for. 

It would be nice for the publisher, or possibly the publisher and retailer together, to decide whether they’re licensing or selling (or both), and then price differentially and accordingly. 

Don’t forget

I have no legal training. I’m just making lay observations, so don’t interpret any of this as legal advice, silly.