English-Arabic Glossary – Quadratics

Hello, مرحبا!

I’m slowly improving my glossary of math terms in Arabic, and I’ve posted an updated version below.

Some of the terms in this part of my MPM2D course are new to everyone, so the Arabic translation isn’t always helpful (e.g. the word “parabola” or “قطع مكافئ” has little meaning to any student before now, regardless of their language background).

There are a lot of terms in this part of the course, so I’ve moved into a landscape format to try to fit everything. Hopefully the font size is still large enough.

If you can help with translation, I would appreciate it!

Quadratic Relations Terms – Updated 2018-11-11 (PDF file)

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Developing an English-Arabic math glossary (MPM2D)

I’m working on this project so that ELL students will have a little bit easier time in my math classes (making the translation burden a little lighter).

I’ve just finished an Analytic Geometry unit in Grade 10 Academic Math, and I put together this glossary of terms using some online resources:

Analytic Geometry Terms – Chart

I gave the same resource to all students, not just ELL students. We filled in the chart with diagrams to help explain the terms visually.

For the next unit, though, I need some support. The online resources I have found are missing some terms that I’ll be using. I have an asterisk (*) beside the terms I’m less certain about. If you can help, please comment below with corrections and additions.

Quadratic Relations Terms

Welcome to e-Learning. You can’t use the Internet.

It’s the first day of my e-Learning course and a student from another school board sent me an apologetic email.

The student was sorry to inform me that their board has blocked student access to all of the web services we use to communicate.

no-learning

This isn’t just inconvenient; it’s preventing the student from joining the community of learners that we’re developing.

When will the fear of failing their students outweigh their fear of the Internet?

Dot Paper Generator

I’ve been using dot paper (both “square” and isometric) in my grade 9 class lately, so I put together a Java application that generates it. The image files it produces are PNG files. Feel free to use it if it’s helpful. No warranty, expressed or implied, yada-yada.

Google Drive link to download .JAR application file

DotPaperSample.png

Sample PNG file.

Here are a couple of PDF examples that I produced from the PNG files:

Letter-QuarterInch-DotPaper

Letter-Isometric-QuarterInch-paper

The PNG files are set to 72dpi, not the desired dpi the user chooses… I haven’t figured out a simple way to set that information in the PNG metadata. The PDF files above are both 600 dpi, if I remember correctly. 

Math RPG – revised and starting tomorrow

I’m going to start the Math RPG with my Grade 9 class tomorrow. It’s a way to help track and encourage homework completion, performance on evaluations, and “academic behaviour” (like getting extra help).

Here’s the sheet each student will use:

Math RPG Character Sheet and Rules.png

The character tracking sheet.

Here’s a PDF: Math RPG Character Sheet and Rules

I have two units left in the course to play with it (Measurement and Geometry), so that’s why the Levelling Up part is so short on the student version.

I’m wondering who is going to ask for a +1 Magic Sword… :)

See my previous post for longer-form rules and examples: Math RPG?

Math RPG?

I started working on a Math RPG based heavily on the Bullet Journal RPG (BuJoRPG) at Emerald Specter. I’ve been trying out a modified BuJoRPG for myself, and I wondered if something similar might motivate some students. At the least, I’m hoping it’ll make academic behaviour tracking easier and more visible.

Here’s my first draft. Students will track their own progress (I’ll check their homework completion, probably). Let me know what you think, and if you have suggestions!

Math RPG v0.1a

Starting a new Role Playing Game Club

Today was the inaugural meeting of the Superior Heights Role Playing Game club. Over the past two weeks I’ve asked interested students to create first-level characters that they would be interested in playing. I recommended orcpub2.com using the Point Buy system for stats to help ensure a “legal” character for each of them. To my surprise, fifteen students want to play.

That’s a lot.

Like, three games’ worth.

I’m the only GM available, it appears, so I don’t know what I’m going to do about that. I’m committing to spending two hours with them every Friday night after school, plus all the prep work between sessions. I’m considering rotating groups through, running two or three games on a cycle.

This afternoon there were “only” six players. Several students had other commitments or couldn’t get rides home after the game. Six was manageable, but only just.

Rules

Apart from the official game rules, I set out some rules for the club at school. Here’s a paraphrasing of them.

  • Everyone is responsible for ensuring the group is having fun.
  • You are not your character. In-game stuff (especially conflicts) need to stay in the game.
  • No foul language. You might be okay with it, but I’m not and the person beside you might not be.
  • No sex of any kind.
  • No violence towards children.

The students also added a rule to my list:

  • No player-versus-player (PvP) combat.

The Start

This was even more challenging than I expected. All six players were new to the game, but they had all spent time developing characters already.

My plan was to help them to build connections between characters by requiring them to answer questions about their pasts. “Sally, what serious event did your character and Mark’s character both witness?” “Jim, what is it about Jordan’s character that irritates your character?” That sort of thing.

There was a frustrating trend that began here and continued throughout the session. A player would suggest something (here it was an event in the backstory), and then another player would suggest a different and mutually exclusive idea, and then both players would be at a standstill. Both were invested in their idea, and neither wanted to work with the other’s suggestions. I didn’t know how to help them work this out, but I did the best I could. This problem slowed the game significantly.

I did my best to roll with (ha ha) the backstories the players had developed to set the initial scene. Players didn’t really know what to do, and I wished that I had forced them to develop a party before starting (instead I asked them to work at coming together in the first session).

Some characters took actions that helped the party come together, but other characters took actions that drove the party apart. Making decisions among six people was onerous.

When the session was wrapping up I recapped the major events so far to make sure we were in sync. I also talked with the players about how to play together instead of just making sure their characters did cool stuff for themselves. I guess we’ll see next time if my post-session pep talk was helpful.

Even though the game was super-challenging for me and not as successful (progressive?) as I’d hoped, it was clear that most of the players had fun. They left the classroom and stood in the hall, talking about what happened and speculating about what could happen next. They were intrigued, and some talked about tweaking their characters to make them more “playable” with the rest of the group.

Fingers crossed that I’m a bit better at this next week.