Why Aren’t Students Engaged?

An open math textbook with sheets of written notes on top.

Today I worked with all of the other e-Learning teachers in my board. We had some excellent discussions which tended to drift back to the idea of student engagement.

I don’t really like the term “engagement”; I don’t think it’s clear enough. People have very different understandings of the word in the context of student learning, and that can get in the way of real improvement.

For example, asking “what does student engagement look like?” yields responses like “they’re paying attention” or “they complete the assigned work” alongside “they are applying their learning to their own lives” and “they connect to outside sources for learning”.

Some of these are more accurate or useful than others, but they are all indications of student engagement, I guess.

But for me, student engagement is a question of student intent in their learning, which isn’t exactly an observable behaviour.

I like this definition: “A student is engaged in learning when they feel a compulsion to pursue the learning apart from external motivations.”

That last bit is key for me: why is the student learning? Because they need the marks? Because they fear consequences? Because they are enthralled by a question? Because they are curious?

So this leads me to the question: why are my students disengaged? The question holds as much value regarding e-Learning students as face-to-face students.

My colleagues and I identified approximately a bazillion potential causes of and contributing factors to disengagement. These are approaches or circumstances which prevent students from developing the compulsion to learn. Some of them we can work to improve; others we can’t.

But in the end I keep coming back to this idea: Good questions produce a compulsion to find answers, and the best questions are students’ own questions.

Look at me: I just spent an entire day grappling with questions alongside my peers, and here I am trying to make more sense of it at night. I have a dozen other tasks to complete before I can sleep, but I need to get this out right now so that I can pursue the answers. I am compelled.

So how do we foster a spirit of questioning and a culture of inquiry in the context of prescribed learning?

That’s my own challenge to work on tomorrow: how will I ensure that I’m giving students both the guidance and the latitude they need to pose great questions and then pursue the answers?

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4 thoughts on “Why Aren’t Students Engaged?

  1. I’m not teaching right now, but worried about the same things with e-learning. at one time, I tried to work a “Bait and switch ” approach in that if they weren’t yet trusting the course content, maybe they could start to trust me by just coming to the page. I think engagement works differently for many teachers and students.

  2. Great blog post. I appreciate how your thinking is nuanced. It’s always good to think about examples and non-examples to try and pin down what something actual means.
    To me, engagement is about wellness, joy-de-vivre, joy and being connected. You have pushed me to include that it is also a stance and deeply connected to being inquisitive.
    Great post, as always. Thank you for pushing my thinking and sharing such relevant work.
    Onwards!

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