WotC shouldn’t put expensive cards in preconstructed products #MTG

I’ve seen a lot of commentary in the past couple of weeks about Wizards of the Coast’s decision to discontinue Clash Packs and Event Decks. While I have no particular interest in either product, I assume the people in charge have some good reasons for doing so. Lots of fans have lots of good reasons that they wish these products would still be produced.

One of those reasons that is often repeated is that it’s a way to bring down the cost of some chase cards by providing additional printings and a cheaper way to access those cards. For example, if Wizards puts a card that’s selling for $15 in a Clash Pack with an MSRP of $20 and a street price of $17, it’s going to get snapped up for financial reasons. An enterprising person could buy up a bunch of Clash Packs, crack them and sell that one expensive card from each, and then trickle out the remainder at a tidy profit (perhaps $5-10 per pack). As a result of this easy access the value of that costly card will drop, but there is another effect that is more problematic for the game:

The average customer won’t be able to walk into a store to buy the Clash Pack because it’ll already be sold out.

Who were these products for, really? From my comfortable armchair it seems these are mostly products for people who are new to the game or want to purchase a play experience, not the hardcore grinder nor investor. If that’s true, then making the cards too tempting to the latter types will be denying them to the former.

Last year I thought about buying a fat pack of Battle For Zendikar, partly for the packs and partly for the beautiful, full-art lands. Upon release, though, the price skyrocketed to about $65 USD, vastly more than the MSRP of $40 USD because the lands were desirable. The average player couldn’t get the product for its intended price at a game store, and department stores were instantly sold out. [Aside: you could still buy them at Walmart in Canada for $55 CAD, which was about $40 USD at the time. I thought about snapping them up and flipping them, or their lands, but I resisted the urge.]

If Wizards can make preconstructed products that are fun to play and easy to buy, while still being an okay value for the consumer, they’ll hit the sweet spot for those products. The new Blessed vs. Cursed Duel Deck is apparently just okay financially, but is fun to play. This is a win for Wizards because it’ll bring people into the game (for just $20 USD) but still be enticing to many existing players.

Best of all, it’ll still be on the shelf when you walk into your FLGS to buy it.

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