My not-polished list of signals to think through

Heading home after another EdCan Network Regional Exchange.

I need to write down some of my ideas for signals that I see in our world. Later I’ll try to apply them to education, to see what might have value in our space. Feel free to comment and help me out, okay?

  • custom, handmade, “bespoke” items (personalized, unique, intentionally different, curated)
  • audience and approval (snapchat and instagram, followers, subs, likes, favourites, pruning)
  • return the analog, the analog renaissance (tabletop games, physical books, visual arts, no-phone-zone)
  • mental health awareness (prioritizing individual well-being over homogeneous requirements, arbitrary time, rigidity)
  • results are greater than conformity and compliance (working from home, staggered or varying hours, managers for productivity instead of compliance)
  • science fiction renaissance (thanks Matt Damon)
  • quiet (yoga, adult colouring, gardening and farming, hiking)
  • inefficient activities (games, cooking, pleasure reading, knitting)
  • blurring of retailer and consumer (creator/producer/manufacturer, 3D printing, Uber, freelance)
  • microtransactions (Patreon instead of subscriptions)
  • curated goods (crates)
  • small and local (yarn, food, beer, retail)
  • digital goods (ebooks, virtual currency, access rights)
  • trade facilitation (connecting consumers, eBay, TCG Player, Deckbox.org)
  • premium/pro version/freemium

Okay, that’s it for now until I have time to think some more. Thanks.

Learning at Home: How to be a YouTuber

My son is 8, and he wants to be a famous YouTuber like DanTDM. Although I realize this aspiration may be short-lived, I’m open to the possibility. I also know that he probably won’t find this learning in the Ontario Curriculum.

So I decided I’d better figure out how this stuff works so that I can help him understand (and possibly realize) his dream.

I have a YouTube channel already. I post math and computer science videos, mostly, and a few more personal things. I don’t monetize the teaching videos since I direct my students to view them and that would be inappropriate. It was time to start a new channel.

I wanted a channel with a focus, but that was broad enough to allow for lots of content. The kids and I enjoy watching videos of booster box openings (Magic: The Gathering and Pokemon), and I watch more MTG videos. This is something I know a fair bit about, and I can produce content easily (if not always cheaply).

So Grasley Games was born. These aren’t games I’ve designed (that’s coming, though). Instead, “games” is a verb here.

Logo bold

I started by opening a box of Aether Revolt, the newest set of Magic: The Gathering available at the time. I practised for a while first, figuring out camera setup, microphone, lighting, and how to hold the cards effectively. I’ve done some video production work before, but I was still surprised at how challenging this initial planning was.

I also wanted to try some “actual plays”, recordings of playing games. I’ve recorded about 10 games, but only a few have been worth posting. Lots of camera problems with this stuff.

The channel is monetized, which means that some ad revenue accumulates over time. So far there’s $1.86 waiting for me. Another couple of lifetimes and I’ll pay for that box…

Now for the kids

This wasn’t just for me, remember? Both my kids want to participate too. Now that I’ve learned the basics of setting everything up, they’re starting to make videos for me to post. There are three so far on the channel:

What’s next

They keep asking to make more videos (I got enough stuff for them to make 6 videos each on these topics without any additional investment), so that’s pretty cool. I do want them to see how difficult it is to get eyes on your content when you’re in a fairly niche area, and that consistency is really important (they’re counting on me for this).

I’ve also made other spaces on the web for Grasley Games – we’ll see how these platforms pan out:

Grasley Games on WordPress

Grasley Games on Facebook

Grasley Games on Patreon

Grasley Games on Twitter

What do you choose to learn about when you’re not at school?

I had an interesting talk with the student today about a variety of topics related to schooling and education. I asked her one question which has been staying with me throughout the evening so far. 

“What do you learn about when you’re not at school? What do you learn about because you want to, not because you have to? What are you curious about?”

I think each person’s answers can give some insight into what their passions are. Curiosity is an incredibly valuable commodity, and nurturing it is some of the most important work we do. Let’s help foster the inquiring mindset while being careful not to steal the passion by imposing our structures. 

Plane thoughts – part 5

I recently participated in a meeting for the EdCan Network, part of the Canadian Education Association, in Mississauga. I knew we’d be talking about some heavy issues regarding education in Ontario, especially K-12 education. I spent my time on the flights down and back writing some thoughts I’d been wrestling with. I’m planning to share those thoughts in small posts for a little while. Here’s the fifth entry.

People look to YouTube for experts when learning, especially when learning outside of the context of formal education.

This is very effective if many people want to learn the same thing, because YouTube promotes effective (or at least popular) teaching examples above the poor examples. You can learn to play the guitar, change a tire, or factor a complex trinomial.

It is less effective (or impossible) if only a very few people want to learn the same thing, because that niche knowledge may not be present in video form, or there may be few examples to curate. The same is true if the development of a skill requires careful supervision.

In this case it may be necessary to look elsewhere for an expert, and perhaps to have a direct, one-to-one relationship with them, such as a master-apprentice relationship.

Plane thoughts – part 3

I recently participated in a meeting for the EdCan Network, part of the Canadian Education Association, in Mississauga. I knew we’d be talking about some heavy issues regarding education in Ontario, especially K-12 education. I spent my time on the flights down and back writing some thoughts I’d been wrestling with. I’m planning to share those thoughts in small posts for a little while. Here’s the third entry.

School is not the only organization educating a child. The broader community shares that responsibility and provides opportunities that a school can’t. There is sometimes a lack of connection between a school and the surrounding community, though. There are programs to help bridge the divide, but it’s usually not an integral part of the school system in Ontario.

If a school or community wants to nurture a child but lacks some expertise, it must look beyond its borders for an extended family to draw upon. Today there is a global community available to support our local context with opportunities and expertise.

Regardless of the source of the expertise, there is a critical failure if the “expert” is incorrect. The consensus of expert opinion is required to determine which ideas, skills, and understandings are valuable and which are incomplete, flawed, or even dangerously wrong. The internet is not always good at helping us to determine the consensus, and the skills of critical thinking are the most important to ensuring our learning is accurate.

Plane thoughts – part 2

I recently participated in a meeting for the EdCan Network, part of the Canadian Education Association, in Mississauga. I knew we’d be talking about some heavy issues regarding education in Ontario, especially K-12 education. I spent my time on the flights down and back writing some thoughts I’d been wrestling with. I’m planning to share those thoughts in small posts for a little while. Here’s the second entry.

Our curriculum is a Least Common Multiple curriculum. Consider all of the different factors that are components of the complete educations for each child. Our exhaustive curriculum tries to include all of those factors in every child’s education. This is unnecessary and inefficient, and frustrating for the students. This is the Just-In-Case curriculum.

We need a Greatest Common Divisor curriculum. We should identify the factors that are in common between every child’s educational needs and include only those in the compulsory curriculum. This minimalist approach would leave room for children to explore and specialize without wasting their time on irrelevancies. This is the Just-In-Time curriculum.

Consider how schools would be different with narrow curricula and expansive opportunities. A small core and room to explore.

 

Plane thoughts – part 1

I recently participated in a meeting for the EdCan Network, part of the Canadian Education Association, in Mississauga. I knew we’d be talking about some heavy issues regarding education in Ontario, especially K-12 education. I spent my time on the flights down and back writing some thoughts I’d been wrestling with. I’m planning to share those thoughts in small posts for a little while. Here’s the first entry.

Learning is not about acquiring knowledge and skills. You’re learning whenever something is changing you. It can be intentional, accidental, or incidental.

Learning can be good, bad, or neutral. Learning to be accepting of others is usually good. Learning to abuse power is generally bad. Learning to factor quadratic expressions is probably neutral.

Learning doesn’t have to be permanent, although it’s not fleeting (because then it hasn’t changed you). Skills can fade, knowledge can be forgotten, and new understandings can supplant old ideas.

If school education is only about the narrow, curriculum-knowledge-and-skills learning, it’s missing the richest and most valuable kind of learning.