Starting a new Role Playing Game Club

Today was the inaugural meeting of the Superior Heights Role Playing Game club. Over the past two weeks I’ve asked interested students to create first-level characters that they would be interested in playing. I recommended orcpub2.com using the Point Buy system for stats to help ensure a “legal” character for each of them. To my surprise, fifteen students want to play.

That’s a lot.

Like, three games’ worth.

I’m the only GM available, it appears, so I don’t know what I’m going to do about that. I’m committing to spending two hours with them every Friday night after school, plus all the prep work between sessions. I’m considering rotating groups through, running two or three games on a cycle.

This afternoon there were “only” six players. Several students had other commitments or couldn’t get rides home after the game. Six was manageable, but only just.

Rules

Apart from the official game rules, I set out some rules for the club at school. Here’s a paraphrasing of them.

  • Everyone is responsible for ensuring the group is having fun.
  • You are not your character. In-game stuff (especially conflicts) need to stay in the game.
  • No foul language. You might be okay with it, but I’m not and the person beside you might not be.
  • No sex of any kind.
  • No violence towards children.

The students also added a rule to my list:

  • No player-versus-player (PvP) combat.

The Start

This was even more challenging than I expected. All six players were new to the game, but they had all spent time developing characters already.

My plan was to help them to build connections between characters by requiring them to answer questions about their pasts. “Sally, what serious event did your character and Mark’s character both witness?” “Jim, what is it about Jordan’s character that irritates your character?” That sort of thing.

There was a frustrating trend that began here and continued throughout the session. A player would suggest something (here it was an event in the backstory), and then another player would suggest a different and mutually exclusive idea, and then both players would be at a standstill. Both were invested in their idea, and neither wanted to work with the other’s suggestions. I didn’t know how to help them work this out, but I did the best I could. This problem slowed the game significantly.

I did my best to roll with (ha ha) the backstories the players had developed to set the initial scene. Players didn’t really know what to do, and I wished that I had forced them to develop a party before starting (instead I asked them to work at coming together in the first session).

Some characters took actions that helped the party come together, but other characters took actions that drove the party apart. Making decisions among six people was onerous.

When the session was wrapping up I recapped the major events so far to make sure we were in sync. I also talked with the players about how to play together instead of just making sure their characters did cool stuff for themselves. I guess we’ll see next time if my post-session pep talk was helpful.

Even though the game was super-challenging for me and not as successful (progressive?) as I’d hoped, it was clear that most of the players had fun. They left the classroom and stood in the hall, talking about what happened and speculating about what could happen next. They were intrigued, and some talked about tweaking their characters to make them more “playable” with the rest of the group.

Fingers crossed that I’m a bit better at this next week.

Advertisements

Chaotic Trading Cards up for grabs

A few years ago I bought a whole bunch of booster packs for the Chaotic Trading Card game. The kids and I sorted through them all, organizing them by colour, type, and coolness.

We played a few games, but mostly the cards just sat in a box on my armoire. I’ve since moved on to other games, and I only use the Chaotic cards when I need to stiffen up a print and play game in sleeves. It’s time to purge.

So I thought I’d check to see if anyone who reads this blog wants a bunch of foil Chaotic cards, the rare or better ones. Here’s a list of the different factions and the number of each rarity:

OverWorld: 16 (12 rare, 3 super rare, 1 promo)
UnderWorld: 20 (18 rare, 2 super rare)
Danian: 16 (16 rare)
Mipedian: 11 (9 rare, 2 super rare)
M’arrillian: 9 (7 rare, 2 super rare)
Generic Mugic: 3 (2 rare, 1 super rare)
Location: 21 (16 rare, 5 super rare)
Attack: 34 (27 rare, 7 super rare)
Battlegear: 24 (16 rare, 6 super rare, 2 ultra rare)

The Ultra Rare cards are Warriors of Owayki (pictured) and Dread Tread.

Foil Chaotic cards

A few cards have some wear from slight play, and a handful (maybe 5 or 6?) have actual creases or dings (I was playing with a five year old). Note that the are quite a few duplicates of some cards (for example, there are 7 Landgore and 2 Winterclaw).

That’s a total of 154 foil Chaotic cards, mostly rares. It’ll probably cost a few dollars to ship them in Canada, and more to the rest of the world. Anyone have an offer? If you’re local and want to pick them up (or if you go to my school) you can have them gratis.

Designing a Trading Card Game (#TCG)

My daughter and I worked together to make a card game. I have played around with the Chaotic TCG and found it a little complicated to play with the kids. So this one is simpler but still interesting, I hope.

I’m sure there are lots of fascinating books and articles about how to design fun, clever, fair, and complete TCGs. Having not even looked for that literature, we ventured into creating by trial and error. It’s a good learning experience, I suppose, to work through problems which someone else has already tackled but to not access any “hints”. Also, we’re not trying to develop a commercially viable game, so I’m okay with it being an imperfect game.

The game doesn’t have a name. There are currently 10 character cards and 10 location cards. We’ll add more soon, if it’s worth continuing. The basic premise is that each player has a party of characters and must attack the other player until someone is defeated entirely. Battles occur between pairs of characters, and each character heals completely between conflicts.

  1. Each player lays their character cards face up on the table.
  2. Location cards are shuffled and placed in a pile face down.
  3. Each player rolls a die until one player rolls a lower value than the other. The player with the lower roll is the first attacker.
  4. The attacker selects a character card from each player; these characters will battle.
  5. A location card is turned over.
  6. The location card determines which player strikes first (either the attacker or the defender) and whether the initial attack is a close attack or a distant attack.
  7. The location card determines the initial conditions; for example, a particular location may provide a certain character with additional HP or may reduce magical resistance.
  8. For each turn, the active player may (a) attack; (b) reposition; or (c) flee. After this action is completed, the other player becomes active and begins their turn.
  9. Attacking: If the current position is Close, use the attacker’s Close Attack formula. If the current position is Distant, use the attacker’s Distant Attack formula. The attacking player rolls a die and calculates the gross damage done. The value is then reduced by the defending character’s Resistance (Physical Resistance if the attacker has the Physical attack Type; Magical Resistance if the attacker has the Magical attack Type). If the value is below zero, no damage is done. The defender’s Hit Points are reduced by the net damage done. If the Hit Points remaining are zero or less, the character is defeated.
  10. Repositioning: The current attack position is either Close or Distant; the active player can use their turn to attempt to reposition. The player rolls a die; if the value rolled is 5 or 6 then the current attack position is changed. If the value rolled is not 5 or 6, there is no change.
  11. Fleeing: The active player may attempt to flee the conflict by rolling a die; if the value rolled is 6 then the battle is ended. It does not matter which player flees a battle. A player may only flee 3 battles in the course of an entire game.
  12. After  a battle is complete (either because of a character’s defeat or because one character has fled), control passes to the other player, who returns to step 4. If all of a player’s characters have been defeated, that player has lost.

I had to travel for work, so we haven’t had a chance to play yet. Also, we haven’t made any artwork for the cards, which should also be fun. Once we’ve tried out the game, we’ll refine and expand it (if we like it, that is).