Theros Block simple [almost] Pauper cube

Before Theros rotated out I bought a playset of all of the commons in Standard, from Theros to Dragons of Tarkir (I got them from MetaGamingNW through ebay if you’re interested: http://www.ebay.ca/usr/metagamingnw*com).

I like the idea of drafting, but I don’t like the idea of spending $20 to play a couple of games of Magic. Besides, with all of these cards in the house, don’t I already have enough to play?

So I made a Cube. Apparently most people have carefully constructed Cubes – they consider which cards have good synergy, they allow for a variety of specific archetypes, and they try to include some choice cards which are exciting to play with. This is very time-consuming, popular, and probably a lot of fun.

I did something a lot simpler.

Deciding on the cards

First, I wanted a Cube with 360 cards (24 packs times 15 cards each) so I can draft nicely. Here are the number of common cards in the sets in Theros block:

  • Theros: 101
  • Born of the Gods: 60
  • Journey Into Nyx: 60

This is a total of 221. Of course, I have 4 of each common card in each set, so I have:

  • Theros: 404
  • Born of the Gods: 240
  • Journey Into Nyx: 240

This is a total of 884. These are not nice numbers. That Theros 101/404 is the problem.

By colour, though, things are interesting:

 Set  White  Blue  Black  Red  Green  Other  Total
 THS  19  19  19  19  19  6  101
 BNG  12  12  12  12  12  0  60
 JOU  12  12  12  12  12  0  60

Those “other” cards in Theros are 5 artifacts and one gold land (Unknown Shores). These aren’t nice numbers either (it would have been sweet if Theros had 24 per colour), but I had an idea to round things out without having to pick just a few cards to have doubles of within a colour.

I decided to include 2 of each card from Born of the Gods and Journey Into Nyx, and 1 of each WUBRG card from Theros. I also added in Unknown Shores to round out the numbers:

 Set  White  Blue  Black  Red  Green  Other  Total
 THS  19  19  19  19  19  1  96
 BNG  24  24  24  24  24  0  120
 JOU  24  24  24  24  24  0  120

Add ’em up and it’s 336, exactly 24 short of the 360 I wanted.

I dug into my Uncommons and found 4 of each colour from Theros block (I tried to have a mixture of types – creatures, sorceries, etc.), adding 20 and bringing me to 356 cards.

Those 5 artifacts bothered me, though. I didn’t have a way to put them in without unbalancing the colours. In the end I decided to leave them out, and instead I put in 4 uncommon artifacts from the block. This had the advantage of giving me exactly 24 uncommons, too.

Making the Boosters

After reading this post on MTG Salvation (link), I decided to do something similar with my Theros stuff to organize the boosters.

I shuffled the three sets of commons together by colour (i.e. a pile of White, a pile of Blue, etc.). The uncommon cards I spread out as starters for my 24 boosters, one uncommon per pack. It’s sort of like having a rare to choose from in the pack. Then from the shuffled commons piles, I put two of each colour in each booster (10+1=11 cards each now). To help increase the variability a bit, I shuffled each booster separately and took out one card. It’s possible the I removed the uncommon card, so maybe next time I will add the uncommon at the end. Ah well.

I now had 24 boosters with 10 cards each. I shuffled the undistributed cards all together (which included the card I just removed from each booster, the other colour piles, and Unknown Shores), and then put 5 cards from that stack in each booster pile. This brings each booster up to 15 cards.

Distribution

Because I put 2 of each colour into each pack at the beginning, there will be a good mixture of colours. For example, you couldn’t get a booster with a colour missing entirely. This does reveal a little bit of information, rarely: if you get a pack for the second pick and a colour is absent, you know that the person before you took that colour of card. It’ll happen pretty rarely, though, so I’m not worried about it. This is supposed to be casual, remember?

Also, because I may have removed uncommons and redistributed them, it’s possible to get more than 1 uncommon in a pack (up to 6, I suppose).

Packaging

I flipped half of each booster around so only the brown cardbacks are showing on each side, then jammed them into penny sleeves. 24 boosters fit nicely into a BCW 1-BX-400 box:

Now I need to put some land cards in there too. It’s going to be tough to have enough lands to work with, since my supply is kind of low. I’ll have to pick up some more sometime when I see them offered cheaply somewhere. The best I can find online is about $20 for 500 land (100 of each) or $30 for 1000 (both including shipping within/to Canada). I have a pretty good stack, but I like to keep my basic land mixed into decks I build, so having more would be awfully nice. (If anyone knows of a cheaper source I’d be grateful).

Playing

I haven’t tried it out yet, but I figure I should be able to get some kids at school to play, right?

Brewing for Pauper EDH (Commander) in Paper

I’ve been listening to Commanderin’, a podcast about the Commander/EDH format of Magic: The Gathering. It’s a great show with excellent production quality. 

Commander is an eternal format, meaning cards don’t rotate out (expire) over time. It also requires the use of Legendary creatures as commanders, which are typically rare and expensive. The rest of a Commander deck is comprised of 99 other unique cards and basic lands (not unique).

Sounds expensive, eh? It is. 

So I wandered onto the Interwebs and found this site, with rules for Pauper Commander:

Pauper and Peasant Commander
Sadly, the site and its successor are not being maintained, but the rules are there. Basically, it’s the Commander format with only common cards except for a possibly-uncommon Commander. The commander doesn’t have to be Legendary either, which vastly increased the number of possible choices. 

I dig into my miscellaneous, unsorted multicolour cards and found these six which seem to have fun effects:

  
I’m sure there are more powerful commanders in many sets, but I’m playing with what I have (i.e. I’m not buying more cards for this). Any thoughts about the viability of any of these cards for Pauper EDH?

Standard Pauper Battle For Zendikar, and the loss of Theros-M15

I play Magic: The Gathering (MTG or Magic) with my wife, my kids, a few friends, some students at school (hey guys!) and online.

New Magic sets are released a couple of times a year, and they are legal for Standard play for a while. Eventually they “rotate out” as they are replaced by newer sets, and the cards are only legal for play in other formats (don’t worry, there are many formats to choose from).

I have a bunch of paper cards which are “Standard” at the moment (they are from recent sets). I bought playsets (4 each) of common cards from Theros, Born of the Gods, Journey into Nix, M15 Core, Khans of Tarkir, Fate Reforged, and Dragons of Tarkir. This lets me play Standard Pauper, a format in which you can only use common cards (i.e. no uncommon, rare, or mythic rare cards).

Until tomorrow, that is… then Theros through M15 Core rotate out and aren’t legal for Standard play anymore.

For me, that’s not really a big deal. I’m not playing in tournaments. They’re perfectly good cards for a perfectly good game, it just won’t be Standard Pauper (unless I stick with just Fate Reforged and Dragons of Tarkir). I don’t need to buy more paper cards.

The Online story is different.

I started playing MTGO (username: bgrasley) a week or so ago. I now have all of the common cards from Khans through Origins (the one right after Dragons). I didn’t bother with anything before Khans because of the upcoming rotation. Battle for Zendikar comes out tomorrow (I think it’s the same time online), so then I’ll wait a few days until the common price is in line with the rest of the sets. I wonder if I might even be able to pick up Theros through M15 cheaply (right now, the price is 0.002 tickets per card, which is slightly less than a dollar for an entire set… “cheaply” is relative).

I’m most interested in playing Standard Pauper so I’ll definitely need to pick up BFZ’s commons soon so I have more cards to work with. It should be interesting.

The two card I’ll really miss

Triplicate Spirits and Raise the Alarm. Both of these white spells generate foolish numbers of tokens very cheaply. The 1/1 White Flying Spirit Tokens have won me several games.

I haven’t played with the Theros block cards yet (they’re still wrapped up in the box), so I won’t miss anything from there yet. I understand people who play other colours have some painful losses to rotation as well.

I’m going to read some set reviews, especially those focused on Standard Pauper, and see what I might brew up for BFZ.

What are you going to miss?

MTG Pauper M15 Core-only Mono-Red deck

Round two… I modified my BW deck from yesterday a bit (took out Divine Favor and Unmake the Graves, replacing them with Selfless Cathar, Necrobite, and Crippling Blight) then spent just a few minutes putting together a Mono Red Pauper deck again using only M15 Core commons. Here’s the (as yet unplayed) deck:

Creatures (24)
4 Borderland Marauder
4 Foundry Street Denizen
4 Generator Servant
4 Thundering Giant
4 Torch Fiend
4 Wall of Fire

Instants (8)
4 Crowd’s Favor
4 Lightning Strike

Enchantments (8)
4 Hammerhand
4 Inferno Fist

Land (20)
20 Mountain

I don’t know if I should have that many Thundering Giants, but I figure I can trade up my Generator Servants for them in round 3 or so. There are a bunch of cards in here I’ve never used, so we’ll see what happens. Comments and concerns welcome :)

MTG Pauper M15 Core-only BW deck

I mentioned a while ago that I bought playsets of all common cards from Theros up to Dragons of Tarkir. I decided this weekend to make a Black-White Pauper deck using only cards from the M15 Core Set to try out against a couple of Fate Reforged Intro decks I have and some kids at school. So far it’s performing fairly well, if a little slowly. First the card list, and then I’ll give my thoughts on it so far.

Creatures (16)
2 Carrion Crow
2 Child of Night
2 Heliod’s Pilgrim
2 Oreskos Swiftclaw
2 Soulmender
2 Sungrace Pegasus
4 Typhoid Rats

Spells (24)
2 Covenant of Blood
2 Divine Favor
4 Eternal Thirst
2 Oppressive Rays
4 Raise the Alarm
4 Sign in Blood
4 Triplicate Spirits
2 Unmake the Graves

Land (22)
4 Evolving Wilds
9 Plains
9 Swamp

Total cost was peanuts (this is Pauper, after all). If you paid $0.10 per card it would be $6, which is about what I paid for all the M15 Core commons together.

I have 8 cards which generate 1/1 tokens (Raise the Alarm and Triplicate Spirits). Those are nice, and I’ve been able to make them work each game.

I originally had 2 Festergloom in there, but I realized (belatedly) that they would kill off my own white tokens. Maybe it would fit into a Mono-Black deck. I swapped them out for Unmake the Graves. I have yet to draw that card, but I think it might not be helpful given the number of tokens I’m using versus creature spells.

Oppressive Rays works well to slow the pace and make sure my 1/1 wimps can chip away at the other player.

Divine Favor hasn’t helped too much. It might be good to boost Oreskos Swiftclaw‘s toughness, but how often will that happen?

I’ll tweak it some more. Suggestions always welcome!

Liking Magic: The Gathering

I’ve recently started to play Magic: The Gathering (MTG) for fun (i.e. not competitively). There are dozens of casual play formats that let you tailor the game to your preferences, and “kitchen table Magic” can be cheap.

I just bought a couple thousand common cards (i.e. the most commonly found in booster packs, 10 of the 15 cards) for about $40, and that’s enough to play with my family for years without getting bored. These cards are not valuable, nor can you reasonably expect to win much against competitive players in the MTG community, but it’s a ton of fun without a huge investment. The game formats using only common cards are called “Pauper” formats.

Magic has both a main game and a “metagame”. In the main game each player has a deck of cards and tries to defeat her or his opponent. In the metagame each player tries to build a deck of cards to use in the main game. You can opt out of either game if you want. Don’t like the metagame? Buy or build a preconstructed deck and you can play the main game with it. Just want to build decks, or don’t have any opponents handy? It’s pretty enjoyable just reading cards and trying to figure out how to make them work well together in a deck.

I like both, though. It’s fun to select cards for your deck and then test them against your opponents’ choices. It’s definitely better as a social game than as a solo game (although that’s possible too).

I thought very, very briefly about getting involved in the larger community of players, but it’s impractical and expensive for me. I like the game, but playing with cheap cards seems like a better fit than shelling out hundreds of dollars for the “good” cards. This way I’m not worried about my kids accidentally ruining a card and feeling bad about it. They’re super-replaceable (the cards, not the kids).

Both of my kids like to play and read the cards, and it’s been good for them.

We drive each school day for a healthy distance. A couple of weeks ago my son asked for some “undead” Magic cards (black) to read in the car. He read through about a hundred cards, including the “flavour text” (thematic text that doesn’t affect gameplay) in twenty minutes or so, and he’s seven. Magic and Pokémon both have been good reading challenges for him.

My daughter likes to categorize and sort the cards, although she seems less interested in actually playing the main game. She wants to do some drafting with some homemade “booster packs” (deck building based on a limited selection of random cards) soon, and I’m looking forward to it too.

All of the parts of Magic: The Gathering have been fun and challenging, and I’m glad I started. The only problem is figuring out how to store all these cards. :)

Ready for an M15-KTK-FRF-DTK Pauper Draft

I recently boughts playsets of every common from Theros forward. I found them on ebay, along with 100 basic land, with free shipping (yay!). My LGSs (LGSes? I dunno) don’t carry this sort of thing, so I couldn’t buy them here. 

The cards were packaged nicely in cellophane by set, one of each card in order by collector number: 

 

This meant I didn’t have to sort them at all. This was fine, and expected, but I wouldn’t have minded having to sort them myself; I like to organize stuff. 

My daughter and I opened one bundle from each of M15 Core, Khans of Tarkir, Fate Reforged, and Dragons of Tarkir. We were both excited to see the cards and organize everything. 

We separated the cards into six piles: one for each colour, then one more pile for the non-basic lands, colourless cards (like artifacts), and multicolour cards. We then shuffled each pile and made up little booster packs with two cards from each pile (12 cards per pack) and had a little draft. I drafted mostly Black-Red, with a splash of Blue, and Tori drafted Blue-White. This part was a lot of fun, more than I thought it would be. 

We played a game with our custom, drafted decks and then discussed how best to randomize cards into the packs to cut down on the predictability. We agreed to shuffle all of the cards together before splitting them into packs. This means the packs won’t be as uniform (exactly two of each colour), but it’ll hide what has been taken and it’ll make the process more interesting, we think. 

I made 21 packs of 14 and 5 packs of 15 (otherwise there would be 5 unused cards): 

 

So we’re ready to have a big drafting party. Lots of fun in our father-daughter geekery. :)