How I Use Twitter Professionally – Version 4

Two and a half years ago I wrote How I Use Twitter Professionally, then revised it with How I Use Twitter Professionally – Updated! and How I Use Twitter Professionally – Updated Again!

I guess we’ll make it an annual thing:

My tweets are public.

I’m trying to encourage conversation and collaboration, so my tweets are globally accessible. This also means I don’t make statements I wouldn’t be comfortable with anyone reading – my family, my students, my employer….

I don’t follow a lot of people.

I currently follow 370 people, of whom about 250 are actively tweeting (let’s say at least weekly). Some of these aren’t related to education; for example, I follow The LEGO Group (@LEGO_Group) and authors John Scalzi (@scalzi) and Marko Kloos (@markokloos – he has a new book out today!).

I can’t read all of the stuff they tweet. I’m relying on my tweeps to retweet the really good stuff so I have a better chance of seeing it, or to mention me if it’s something they think I ought to notice.

I accept anyone as a follower, pretty much.

Except for a few obvious accounts, I let anyone follow me. Since my tweets are public, anyone can read them (even without a Twitter account), so letting people follow me doesn’t reveal anything extra. Plus, it’s easier when you don’t have to approve people.

I don’t follow back as a courtesy.

Before I decide to follow someone, I take a look at their tweet history. Is their stream of tweets going to enhance my experience? Will I learn from them? Or will I only learn what they had for breakfast?

I’m a fan of some personal stuff on Twitter, but if you post 300 times a day just to talk without conversing, I don’t need to see it. It’s not about you, it’s just that your use of Twitter doesn’t fit with mine. I think your lifestyle on Twitter should be like the Law of Two Feet: if it’s not working for you, move on.

I don’t accept Direct Messages (DMs) from people I don’t follow.

This cuts down on the spam. Now it’s just mentions, and there aren’t too many of those. This is a good idea for anyone, so I thought I’d list it here.

I also don’t follow people who I don’t want to DM me. That especially includes students. I have my school email for that kind of communication.

I follow hashtags for a while.

I follow #OTRK12 (our annual conference in Mississauga – this week!) and #elADSB (for my Board’s e-Learning teachers). I don’t follow the very busy tags, although I sometimes apply them to my posts (#D2L, #onted, #blendedlearning, #edtech).

I try to follow the people in Northern Ontario. We face many of the same issues, and perhaps we have solutions to help each other. I like that idea.

I don’t cross post to Facebook anymore.

I tweet too much. No one on Facebook wants to read all of that stuff. The handful of FB friends who do are also Twitter users and teachers, so they just go to Twitter to find me. When I write blog posts WordPress will publicize them on Facebook, Twitter, and Google Plus, and I’m certain that’s plenty for the FB crowd.

I use Tweetdeck; it rocks.

Chrome has TweetDeck as an app; I like that I can have columns for a variety of things I want to look at. Currently I have my Twitter timeline, my Twitter Interactions, my Twitter Messages (DMs), and columns for a bunch of hashtags and lists I follow.

I say things for myself, and I say things for others.

I tweet things that I want to remember or revisit (great for “note-taking” at a session/workshop/conference). I also tweet things to inform others or start conversations. My tweets (of links and such) aren’t endorsements, but since people sometimes view them that way I try not to share stuff that I’m not at least familiar with.

I talk a lot, but not too much

I try to ask questions and help out when others ask questions. I’m proud to say I am included as an honourary member of the SGDSB educators list because I help out the teachers up there, so I think my contributions are valued.

More importantly, I’m developing relationships with these distant folks, and the growth of my PLN has helped me out in my work as well. It was very exciting last year at OTRK12 to meet people whom I knew only through Twitter, and it was surprising how natural the face-to-face interactions felt. We were already friends. So thanks, tweeps.

If you want to follow me…

I’m @bgrasley. No pressure, of course. Use Twitter however it works best for you, and don’t be upset if other people use it differently!

Response to @dougpete and using Social Media with students

Once in a while I like to go back an arbitrarily-round-number time in my posts to see what I said. Today I returned to about a year ago and saw a post called tMI – Students’ Personal Lives and Twitter in the Classroom in which I shared some concerns that a teacher brought up during a professional learning session. I quickly read it over, and then tweeted it out again:

Then Doug Peterson (@dougpete) commented on the post, which got me thinking some more. We had a brief Twitter exchange, prompting more firing of neurons. I started to reply with a comment, but I’ve changed my mind. I think I’m ready to paste my new-and-improved-but-still-not-final thoughts in this new post. First, here’s…

Doug’s comment

Interesting post, Brandon. I think you’ve both asked and answered some questions in the post. In light of the fact that the Ontario Curriculum has yet to prescribe the use of social media, it is currently just another tool that a teacher may elect to bring into her or his classroom. I think that there is a good argument for it once a teacher gets his / her head around it. As I would imagine that you’re summizing, I’m in favour of its use, where appropriate. Schools didn’t have internet access when I started teaching but many of my students were connected and connected to me – I ran my own Bulletin Board Service and students were able to dial in and talk on chat boards, ask for homework help, and even upload programs for solution.

To this end, I’m a real fan of a student-created Acceptable Use Policy rather than the legal ones that are so often used. Of course, the teacher drives the policy!

You used the term “wild west” in your post so I’ll throw back another popular analogy that we don’t ask students to drive without teaching them first. What better way to teach the effective and, yes, appropriate use than in the classroom of a professional educator that knows the tool and what it’s capable of.

There are so many “social networks” that are available including the Ministry’s LMS that a mere mortal teacher wouldn’t be able to monitor them all. But, we’ve all been in situations where we see things and we do need to act on them. I can remember, as a football coach, going into the stands to break up an altercation or, as a hockey fan getting involved for no other reason that it’s the right thing to do and one of the participants was wearing a school jacket. I would hope that anyone would do the right thing whether or not they were on the clock.

I think that it’s a good conversation to have and that people aren’t running and hiding. You know that, with the proliferation of services, that it’s going to happen. We’ll look back on these conversations with a smile wondering why we spent the time to comment.

We just need to come to the understanding that we are who we are. Heck, even your blog is letting me know “dougpete: You are commenting using your WordPress.com account.”

And My Reply

Thanks for commenting, Doug. I keep returning to the idea that teachers need to develop some comfort with some platforms so that they can engage with students meaningfully. Part of that is for the learning at hand (the science or philosophy or whatever), but another significant part is for students to learn how to interact appropriately (learning to drive, as you say). I don’t think any more that we should ignore the activities of our youth online just because their virtual personas may be “unreliable”; instead we need to be careful in how we interpret their interactions. The teacher I spoke with wasn’t concerned about whether they were on the clock (teachers are always on the clock), but rather whether they would know what was serious or truthful and what was joking or dishonest.

I’m planning to engage with students online next year, and I’m trying to decide where the boundaries should be. I won’t be using Facebook with students (family and friends only, thank you), but Twitter seems very useful as a learning tool. I’ll be teaching high school students as well, which might make a difference; I just don’t know what kind of difference. I see examples of teachers (like Danika Barker, @danikabarker) using Twitter to engage and interact with learners, and I see a place for that in my own teaching. I’m also a relatively experienced Twitter user, so my comfort with the platform takes away some barriers that another teacher might still need to overcome. As I mentioned in the original post, I believe hashtags are a good way to interact without interfering too much in students’ lives.

So I don’t think we need to protect our teens from social media as though the platforms themselves are evil. Instead we should be working with our youth to understand the place of social media in their (our) lives with a mind to positive, thoughtful interactions and the legacies we leave. We don’t want a young child to be on Twitter, but I think we need our teens to be on Twitter or something like it. How else will they develop the skills and the resiliency they’ll need in other parts of life?

I’m thinking that the “right” approach is to treat online communication much like offline communication. The main differences are that it’s more transparent, more public, and definitely more permanent. Those differences are mostly strengths, but they should inform and temper our uses. The challenge is to be wise in applying these technologies to our communication without introducing a chilling effect. And I think teachers will best be able to meet that challenge if they’ve taken some time to learn a platform well.

Figuring out how to make that happen isn’t easy, of course. I’ve given workshop sessions and written blog posts galore on how a teacher might use Twitter for professional development (this is both to improve their PD and also to help them consider other uses for Twitter). I’ve encouraged my local colleagues to use social media for their learning. I’ve commented on blog posts, invited people to EdCampSault, and offered one-on-one time to learn tools. But teacher need will win out over everything else in its own time: the need to connect with colleagues or the need to improve student learning. When a teacher becomes aware of the power of social media for learning, they’ll see the importance of figuring it out. So I try to be an awareness builder, because these tools are a major part of our lives.

Doug, I really like your last paragraph: ‘We just need to come to the understanding that we are who we are. Heck, even your blog is letting me know “dougpete: You are commenting using your WordPress.com account.”‘

We are developing online presence all the time, and remembering that online presence is a real-life presence should go a long way towards ensuring we make good choices in our interactions with students.

Thanks again for commenting!

How I Use Twitter Professionally – Updated Again!

About a year ago I wrote a blog post called “How I Use Twitter Professionally – Updated!“. Since then I’ve refined or changed my use a bit more, so I thought it was worth refreshing the post again. So, the content below is the same as before, but with current stuff.

My tweets are public.

I’m trying to encourage conversation and collaboration, so my tweets are globally accessible. This also means I don’t make statements I wouldn’t be comfortable with anyone reading – my family, my students, my employer….

I don’t follow a lot of people.

I currently follow 292 people (that’s a big increase in the last year; about doubled), of whom about 200 are actively tweeting (let’s say at least weekly). Some of these aren’t related to education; for example, I follow The LEGO Group (@LEGO_Group).

I can’t read all of the stuff they tweet. I’m relying on my tweeps to retweet the really good stuff so I have a better chance of seeing it, or to mention me if it’s something they think I ought to notice.

I accept anyone as a follower, pretty much.

Except for a few obvious accounts, I let anyone follow me. Since my tweets are public, anyone can read them (even without a Twitter account), so letting people follow me doesn’t reveal anything extra. Plus, it’s easier when you don’t have to approve people.

I don’t follow back as a courtesy.

Before I decide to follow someone, I take a look at their tweet history. Is their stream of tweets going to enhance my experience? Will I learn from them? Or will I only learn what they had for breakfast?

I’m a fan of some personal stuff on Twitter, but if you post 300 times a day just to talk without conversing, I don’t need to see it. It’s not about you, it’s just that your use of Twitter doesn’t fit with mine.

Today I noticed that I have 3 fewer followers than I did a few days ago. Since there were a few new followers recently that means that more than 3 cut me off their list. That’s totally expected, and is actually pretty great. I think your lifestyle on Twitter should be like the Law of Two Feet: if it’s not working for you, move on.

I don’t accept Direct Messages (DMs) from people I don’t follow.

This cuts down on the spam. Now it’s just mentions, and there aren’t too many of those. This is a good idea for anyone, so I thought I’d list it here.

I follow hashtags for a while.

Recently I followed #OTRK12 (our annual conference in Mississauga) and #GAFEsummit. I don’t follow the very busy tags, although I sometimes apply them to my posts (#D2L, #onted, #blendedlearning, #edtech).

I try to follow the people in Northern Ontario. We face many of the same issues, and perhaps we have solutions to help each other. I like that idea.

I don’t cross post to Facebook anymore.

I tweet too much. No one on Facebook wants to read all of that stuff. The handful of FB friends who do are also Twitter users and teachers, so they just go to Twitter to find me. When I write blog posts WordPress will publicize them on Facebook, Twitter, and Google Plus, and I’m certain that’s plenty for the FB crowd.

I use Tweetdeck; it rocks.

Chrome has TweetDeck as an app; I like that I can have columns for a variety of things I want to look at. Currently I have my Twitter timeline, my Twitter Interactions, my Twitter Messages (DMs), columns for #edCampSault, #OTRK12, #OSSEMOOC, @timrobinsonj’s eLC list, @MeglioMedia’s Tech Enabled Learning list, @ColleenKR’s SGDSB list, and #niprockart. It’s great.

I say things for myself, and I say things for others.

I tweet things that I want to remember or revisit (great for “note-taking” at a session/workshop/conference). I also tweet things to inform others or start conversations. My tweets (of links and such) aren’t endorsements, but since people sometimes view them that way I try not to share stuff that I’m not at least familiar with.

I talk a lot, but not too much

I try to ask questions and help out when others ask questions. I’m proud to say I am included as an honourary member of the SGDSB educators list because I help out the teachers up there, so I think my contributions are valued.

More importantly, I’m developing relationships with these distant folks, and the growth of my PLN has helped me out in my work as well. It was very exciting recently at OTRK12 to meet people whom I knew only through Twitter, and it was surprising how natural the face-to-face interactions felt. We were already friends. So thanks, tweeps.

If you want to follow me…

I’m @bgrasley. No pressure, of course. Use Twitter however it works best for you!

“Being an independent practitioner is inconsistent with professional practice.”

wall.jpg by frenchbyte on MorgueFile

Don’t go it alone. Image from frenchbyte via MorgueFile

The title quote is from Catherine Montreuil, Director of Education for Bruce-Grey Catholic District School Board. She said this during her keynote presentation at On The Rise K-12: Enhancing Digital Learning on April 2, 2014.

This has really stayed with me. I’ve thought before about the moral imperative I believe teachers have to use technology in their teaching, and to be a reflective practitioner. I’ve always thought it a basic requirement to keep up-to-date with our best thinking around instructional strategies and assessment approaches.

But I’m not sure I’ve ever really thought about it quite they way she put it: that it’s actually unprofessional to be disconnected.

I believe you can connect in any way you like. Connecting with others in your school is a good first step, but the insular nature of schools can prevent you from seeing the possibilities for learning. Technology has made it tremendously easy to connect, build relationships, and learn from others who think a little differently because they don’t have the challenges/restrictions/history/blindspots that any group has. My preferred platforms are Twitter and WordPress, but there are many ways to share and to question. Create your Professional Learning Network (PLN).

The opportunity is there for all of us. You can choose how deep you want to go, but I don’t think you can in good conscience choose to ignore it completely. Learn from and with others, because no one has all the answers.

A collection of Storify stories from #OTRK12

@tommy2toneman: Hanging with the registration gang. #OTRK12  #OTRK12Selfie

@tommy2toneman: Hanging with the registration gang. #OTRK12 #OTRK12Selfie

Jaclyn Calder (@jaccalder) published the first one I saw, and I thought I might build a collection here. If you created or found a Storify story from On The Rise K-12 2014, please let me know and I’ll add it to the list.

@jaccalder: Competencies Session at OTRK12

@jaccalder: Collection of Notes and Reflections on #OSSEMOOC

@bgrasley: @Stephen_Hurley’s keynote at #OTRK12

@bgrasley@cathymontreuil’s keynote at #OTRK12

@bgrasley: #OTRK12Selfie – A Story of Relationships

@YKrawiecki: On The Rise K-12 2014 Conference

@MeglioMedia: OTRK12 2014

@lynekohutOn The Rise K-12: Enhancing Digital Learning

@htheijsmeijerOTRK12CHOIR

Tweets on the Hundreds

This post’s “publicize” tweet will have been my 3700th tweet. I thought it would be interesting to look back at my tweets which were “on the hundreds” – 100th, 200th, etc. I used AllMyTweets.net to retrieve my last 3200 tweets and did some quick spreadsheet work with them. Note that the links are Twitter’s t.co links, which they use to track clicks. It’s kind of hard to get my early tweets in a nice way (i.e. through the Twitter “request archive” button), so I didn’t bother. I’ve highlighted my 1000th, 2000th, and 3000th tweets. As you can see, I’m not very careful with my “milestone” tweets.

It was a nice little stroll through some memories. Some of them don’t make a lot of sense to me out of their context, but most are pretty clear. My favourites from this list are 1300, 1500, 2100, 2200, 2500, and 3000. I also noted that I said “#srsly” four times.

Number Date Tweet
500 Oct 25, 2012 Central Peel going to have a TEDx! #ecoo12
600 Nov 16, 2012 RT @dougpete: Using Twitter to locate the latest information on your research topic http://t.co/6SqIsp2e via @zite
700 Nov 29, 2012 Sweet! It works! And it’s pretty! “@dougpete: Google adds spreadsheet creation and editing to mobile versions http://t.co/f8CA4UvD”
800 Dec 18, 2012 RT @PJAnello: Well, I’d say @Desire2Learn just got better for students: http://t.co/o37SHF7B #education #innovation
900 Jan 20, 2013 RT @kdesrochers23: Grade 5’s in Calgary would like to know the temperature in your city today! Please RT http://t.co/gA0ifgtY #scichat …
1000 Feb 02, 2013  #instaweatherpro app http://t.co/1DydgNuJ #weather now in #Sault Ste Marie http://t.co/1B9Ha5r2
1100 Feb 13, 2013 Related is Inkscape for vector graphics at http://t.co/Rw2vP55w or http://t.co/rkx31HrK – works with SVG files instead of photos @fryed
1200 Feb 22, 2013 @fryed @jacbalen Intended for leaders, good for everyone! http://t.co/ekZmz7KqUu #onted #educoach
1300 Mar 02, 2013 My son’s watercolour painting today. http://t.co/0yg0nFVqQS
1400 Mar 19, 2013 @dougpete I think One Tab is worth having in my list :)
1500 Mar 26, 2013 Peter Sovran: “I’ll do my very best to give a Ministry answer” to questions #OTRK12
1600 Mar 27, 2013 Session rooms list is at https://t.co/HjdBgtM9T4 (about to start Wednesday Session 1) #OTRK12
1700 Apr 01, 2013 RT @fryed: If safe drinking water is a priority for you, tell @pmharper the WORLD needs the Experimental Lakes Area #savetheela http://t
1800 Apr 08, 2013 RT @Cmdr_Hadfield: Tonight’s Finale: Aurora dances above a ribbon of dawn. http://t.co/ft5GC4JNAs
1900 Apr 16, 2013 @DavidJaremy Well, it’s after 5am and before 11pm, so pretty good :)
2000 Apr 23, 2013  Please reply or add comments to my Google Doc for planning PD on Twitter in the Classroom: https://t.co/hF6s6TcIkf #ontEd #edTech
2100 Apr 25, 2013 #NaPoWriMo – April 25 – “New Position Haiku” http://t.co/TG0ve5hTR8 #poetry #writing
2200 May 01, 2013 I accidentally spelled “awesome” with an “n”, and my phone autocorrected it to “awesomeness”. #awesome
2300 May 12, 2013 Just started a fire in the woodstove. Ridiculous.
2400 May 31, 2013 @dougpete Thanks, and have a great Friday!
2500 Jun 27, 2013 “It takes 700 times less time”? You mean “It takes 1/700th as much time”, otherwise executing that procedure would break causality. #srsly
2600 Sep 18, 2013 @audible_com On my iPhone, while driving, running, or doing dishes.
2700 Oct 10, 2013 Search Creative Commons Flickr images with *multiple colours* at http://t.co/XyNUaPyYm7
2800 Oct 24, 2013 Can’t – need more ingredients! MT @AICTCoordinator: How do you take information and convert it into intelligence? #ecoo13 #edchat #edtech
2900 Oct 26, 2013 I installed Minecraft because of #ecoo13 http://t.co/KL8L0kM2m6
3000 Oct 31, 2013  Why doesn’t MS Excel 2010 have YYYY-MM-DD as a standard date format (it’s ISO 8601!)? I have to TYPE IT IN as a custom format?!? #srsly?
3100 Nov 10, 2013 @TL_Stevenson Awesome! I remember my mom reading to me when I was older. And my high school students always wanted me to read too.
3200 Nov 14, 2013 RT @dougpete: Just blogged… How Wes Fryer Ruined My Day http://t.co/mAhXFfqfty
3300 Nov 19, 2013 @DavidJaremy @swartz19 @timrobinsonj @joelwoodeLc @pjanello @wallied You’re spoiled in ADSB :)
3400 Nov 25, 2013 Anyone have an FSL hashtag or educator list for Twitter? #onted #edchat @PalmsTine
3500 Dec 01, 2013 Just finished assembling 8 game packs of Star Wars Pocketmodel Tactics TCG with the kids. They helped too, honest. http://t.co/ohSy5PauWF
3600 Dec 11, 2013 Students are the digital natives. #FiveWordEdTechHorrors

Joyful Blogging in Response to @fryed

A picture of a boy playing in water in an urban setting.

“Real Joy” by Todd Baker (technowannabe) via Flickr, CC-BY-2.0

Donna Fry challenged me and other Northern Ontario bloggers to be joyful in our blogging and share in Lee Kolbert’s challenge. Here’s my entry in the fun.

The Process

  1. Acknowledge the nominating blogger.
  2. Share 11 random facts about yourself.
  3. Answer the 11 questions the nominating blogger has created for you.
  4. List 11 bloggers.
  5. Post 11 questions for the bloggers you nominate to answer, and let all the bloggers know they have been nominated. Don’t nominate a blogger who has nominated you.

Here we go:

Acknowledge the nominating blogger

Donna Fry – big thinker. Read her stuff (I know I didn’t need to say that, since you do already).

Share 11 random facts about yourself

  1. I like to read fiction, but I stress about what I should read.
  2. Math makes me happy.
  3. Coffee is a food group.
  4. I have read Dealing With Dragons by Patricia C. Wrede about ten times, and I just read some of it to my daughter. I didn’t read the whole thing to her, though, because she couldn’t wait for me and she finished it on her own.
  5. I like cooked tomatoes, but not raw tomatoes. I don’t know why.
  6. My favourite part of winter is that there are no mosquitoes.
  7. If I had no need to work, I don’t know what I would want to do with my time.
  8. My favourite pie is blueberry, followed by raisin and pumpkin. In case you needed to know, like if you’re baking at Christmas time or something.
  9. I wear my watch on my right wrist.
  10. I know how to knit, but I’ve prioritized other things in my life, so I gave all my needles and yarn to my mom.
  11. I feel guilty when I don’t keep up with a podcast or a blog.

Answer the 11 questions the nominating blogger has created for you

1. What was the first “subject area” you studied after leaving high school?
Pure Math and Computer Science at the University of Waterloo. I eventually settled on Combinatorics and Optimization with PM/CS as minors.

2. If you could cook anything, what would you cook for supper tonight?
Pizza, probably with barbecue sauce mixed with the pizza sauce, topped with mozza, asiago, chicken, and red onion.

3. What makes you stop and pause during your day?
Something reasonable but unexpected, whether it’s something I hadn’t thought of or something I disagreed with. Sometimes that changes my mind.

4. Cats or Dogs?
Dogs. Cats are a big, fluffy allergen.

5. If you could have only one Pinterest Board, what would the topic be?
Stuff To Make

6. What was the catalyst that got you blogging in the first place?
I was loving Twitter for connecting with people and having conversations, but sometimes I had more to say. Hence my tagline, “When Twitter isn’t long enough”.

7. What is one (funny) childhood misconception that you had, or that you have experienced with a young child?
I thought “delicatessen” was pronounced “dell-ih-CAT-iss-in” until I said it aloud as an adult. I was laughingly corrected.

8. What was your favourite summer job?
I worked at the UW Instructional Support Group helping students to learn computer science. That’s the job that showed me I wanted to be a teacher. It was a winter term job first, but I returned to it through various seasons.

9. Where do you find flow?
Writing is my flow generator. When I write, things become clearer. I don’t write enough, it seems.

10. What was one personal challenge you faced in 2013?
Finding a balance between work and family is an ongoing challenge, but I think I’m winning. Now I usually only work a lot at night if I want to.

11. What are YOU passionate about?
Mostly I’m passionate about learning stuff, as evidenced by my rather large number of interests.

List 11 bloggers

  1. Kerri Grasley (@KerriGrasley, http://kgrasley.wordpress.com)
  2. David Jaremy (@DavidJaremy, http://davidjaremy.wordpress.com) (see David’s response)
  3. Doug Peterson (@dougpete, http://dougpete.wordpress.com) (Doug was nominated more than once; here is his response)
  4. Peter Anello (@PJAnello, http://anello.ca)
  5. Steve Wilson (@GeraldtonSteve, http://wilsonteacher.ca)
  6. Lisa Donohue (@Lisa_Donohue, http://lisadonohue.wordpress.com)
  7. Brian Aspinall (@mraspinall, http://brianaspinall.com) (see Brian’s response)
  8. Danika Barker (@danikabarkerhttp://danikabarker.ca/barkerblog/)
  9. Eva Thompson (@leftyeva, http://evathompson.wordpress.com) (see Eva’s response)
  10. Colleen Rose (@ColleenKR, http://northernartteacher.wordpress.com)
  11. Mark Carbone (@markwcarbone, http://blog.markwcarbone.ca)

Post 11 questions

  1. Who is the “most famous” person you’ve ever spoken with?
  2. What’s one thing you’ve learned recently for pleasure but not for work?
  3. What’s your favourite type of exercise?
  4. What is something you love to do in each season of the year (name 4 things)?
  5. What’s something you have to do that you feel self-conscious about?
  6. Who helps you to “overcome”?
  7. If you could magically change one thing (and only one!) about the state of technology in education, what would it be?
  8. What do you appreciate?
  9. Who have you thanked today? For what?
  10. Is “unplugging” a good thing for you, or a bad thing, or …?
  11. How did you feel when you were nominated?

Thanks!

Thanks to everyone if you decide to participate, and thanks to Donna! That was fun!